Allround Stories

Creating a strategic design vision for buying cars

UX, UI design and research for product development

Home entertainment used to be about prime time—those few precious hours at night when the whole family would tune in together for a movie or the latest installment of their favorite show.

But things have changed. We’ve even got a new word for the consumption of our favorite movies and television programs: we no longer watch, we stream. Once beholden to scheduled air times, we now stream whenever, wherever; so long as we’ve got a device with a screen and a decent wifi connection. And with
everyone having (at least!) one device handy at all times, there’s no need to compromise with your family on what to watch.

With hundreds of streaming services, tens of thousands of programs to choose from, and the ability to burn through entire seasons as fast as we like, we now consume TV and movies like avid readers consume books.

This is exactly the kind of cultural shift that gets our spidey senses tingling at dscout. So we ran a simple “moments” mission to explore it. In a 4-day study, scouts were asked to capture at least six real-life moments in which they were streaming some kind of media. For each moment they submitted, we asked them to explain why they’d chosen a particular show or movie and what contextual factors influenced this moment.

When we dug into the 139 streaming moments we captured—tagging each based on what we observe in the videos, photos and open-ended responses—it became abundantly clear that our viewing behavior is evolving rapidly, with people streaming to accomplish very specific tasks in their day-to-day lives. That’s what we researchers
like to call “modes.”

Home entertainment used to be about prime time—those few precious hours at night when the whole family would tune in together for a movie or the latest installment of their favorite show.

But things have changed. We’ve even got a new word for the consumption of our favorite movies and television programs: we no longer watch, we stream. Once beholden to scheduled air times, we now stream whenever, wherever; so long as we’ve got a device with a screen and a decent wifi connection. And with everyone having (at least!) one device handy at all times, there’s no need to compromise with your family on what to watch. With hundreds of streaming services, tens of thousands of programs to choose from, and the ability to burn through entire seasons as fast as we like, we now consume TV and movies like avid readers consume books

This is exactly the kind of cultural shift that gets our spidey senses tingling at dscout. So we ran a simple “moments” mission to explore it. In a 4-day study, scouts were asked to capture at least six real-life moments in which they were streaming some kind of media. For each moment they submitted, we asked them to explain why they’d chosen a particular show or movie and what contextual factors influenced this moment.

When we dug into the 139 streaming moments we captured—tagging each based on what we observe in the videos, photos and open-ended responses—it became abundantly clear that our viewing behavior is evolving rapidly, with people streaming to accomplish very specific tasks in their day-to-day lives. That’s what we researchers like to call “modes.”

Home entertainment used to be about prime time—those few precious hours at night when the whole family would tune in together for a movie or the latest installment of their favorite show.

But things have changed. We’ve even got a new word for the consumption of our favorite movies and television programs: we no longer watch, we stream. Once beholden to scheduled air times, we now stream whenever, wherever; so long as we’ve got a device with a screen and a decent wifi connection. And with everyone having (at least!) one device handy at all times, there’s no need to compromise with your family on what to watch. With hundreds of streaming services, tens of thousands of programs to choose from, and the ability to burn through entire seasons as fast as we like, we now consume TV and movies like avid readers consume books.

This is exactly the kind of cultural shift that gets our spidey senses tingling at dscout. So we ran a simple “moments” mission to explore it. In a 4-day study, scouts were asked to capture at least six real-life moments in which they were streaming some kind of media. For each moment they submitted, we asked them to explain why they’d chosen a particular show or movie and what contextual factors influenced this moment.

When we dug into the 139 streaming moments we captured—tagging each based on what we observe in the videos, photos and open-ended responses—it became abundantly clear that our viewing behavior is evolving rapidly, with people streaming to accomplish very specific tasks in their day-to-day lives. That’s what we researchers
like to call “modes.”

Share